Categories
Commonplace Book

Commonplace Book

Metamorphosis: change from one form or shape to another

“Restoration to human form must be warranted and awarded”

From p. 522 of The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy: Themes, Works, and Wonders, Volume 2

Jekyll could not overcome or control the transformations into Hyde and ultimately, it is Hyde’s body that is found dead. Therefore, since Jekyll died in the form of Hyde, does this imply that Jekyll is not worthy of his “good” human form? If that is the case, then can Jekyll even be considered to be the “good” in the good vs. evil dichotomy that appears to be established in the novella?

“Outer, physical, transformations reflect characters’ “true” self”

From p. 523 of The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy: Themes, Works, and Wonders, Volume 2

Jekyll died as Hyde, reflecting his “true self”; therefore, Jekyll was not worthy enough to die in his “better” form as the form of Hyde best reflected who he was on the inside. If Hyde is the true, internal form of Jekyll and with the knowledge of Hyde’s deeds in mind, can Jekyll be trusted as a credible source of information?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *